Video Helmet

Here is something of interest — a US army soldier was killed in a friendly fire incident in Iraq. And amazingly it was all captured on video. Following the death there was a cover-up that is now coming out and being investigated.

Unfortunately the video cannot be embedded in this platform, but is available by following this link.
Salon Magazine Friendly Fire story

I would like to propose that certain cops, like Cornwall Ford, and others be required to wear such helmets when executing their dangerous and courageous missions so that the Jamaican state can increase the confidence of the populace in the legitimacy of JCF actions. How many such helmets does the JCF currently own?

The story about this video first appeared online at Salon Magazine and can be found here.

While I am on the topic, almost daily we’re told that the traffic of guns between Jamaica and Haiti is a large reason for the soaring upsurge in violence on the island in recent years. How many old Soviet submarines have we leased or purchased to be able to monitor what takes place between the two islands? How many high speed patrol boats do we have deployed with night vision goggles and helicopter support with enough light to make the night seem like daybreak?

I’ll write more about it in the crime plan post, much promised and not yet delivered. But for now, I’m just saying…

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26 thoughts on “Video Helmet

  1. @ Owen: I think if they didn’t keep up the constant warnings they’d be accused by conservatives of using these soldiers’ heroic deaths for partisan political purposes as the “evil, wicked, probably-named-Hussein, America-hating, terrorist-loving liberals they are.”

  2. Video helmets can be positive and instrumental in the fight and campaign against crime and violence, by showing whether the police/law enforcement authorities conduct(ed) themselves professionally and legitimately —- as required and specified by the rule of law or codes of conduct —- in the sundry operations they conduct vis-a-vis the criminal elements within the society.But guess what, being cognizant as to how Jamaican police conduct themselves when engaging suspects or criminals, video helmets would, most likely, be rigged, doctored, and compromised whenever there are sensitive police/military operations. Consequently, the truth, with respect to police conduct, psychology, behaviour, physical abuse, excessive aggression, and even summary executions of criminals and possibly the death/killing of innocent individuals may not be fully borne out with such helmets/technologies.Incidentally, please be mindful of the fact, that our police department have not leaped frogged into the twenty first century with respect to the utilization of sophisticated technologies, despite the vacuous rhetoric of modernization by government officials, police bureaucrats, et al. Interestingly, and quite unfortunately, the only piece of technology our police, ostensibly, comprehends —- occassionally —- is how to fire guns in crowded venues, as evidenced at the JLP conference last Sunday. Star, yard police are extremely low on the learning curve when it comes to technology, forensics, inter alia.The police still has a long distance to travel in the execution and administration of the rule of law, even if such technologies were affordable and incorporated in solving crime. Star, accountability, accountability, and more accountability is the critical watchword re Jamaican police. Having said that, that does not suggest or imply that technology is not critical. Nuff respiuect!!!

  3. @ Esteban: I am shocked that you would say thatJamaican police “have not leaped frogged into the twenty first century with respect to the utilization of sophisticated technologies.” Apparently you are not aware that we have had a top-ranking and high quality Scotland Yard professional named Mark Shields working to ‘modernize’ our policing technology.

    I am certain that after Mark Shields’s many dedicated years of illustrious service we are just as modern as Scotland Yard now. Aren’t we?

  4. Diatribalist, a correction is in order re my posting on video helmets.Please read “police departments have not leaped frogged, as opposed to police department have not.” Indeed, an error on my part, as a consequence of time constraints vis-a-vis editing. With respect to Mr. Mark Shields and the question of modernization of the Jamaican Constabulary Force (JCF), I am cognizant of his controversial role in Jamaica, supposedly, as a modernizing agent for the incorporation, application and utilizing of cutting edge policing technologies, modalities and paradigms. Nonetheless, one is of the perspective that the jury is still out on how effective and how positively Mr. Shields impacted on Jamaica, with respect to modernization and the larger question or issue of fighting/abating crime and criminality. Certainly, the Bob Woolmer spectacle comes to mind, but I will leave the professional assessments and evaluations of Mr. Shields’ tenure with the JCF for the relevant agencies, bodies, and organizations to conduct and study.Nuff respect!!

  5. We don’t even have money for decent police stations, much more getting helmets outfitted with cameras! Furthermore our police force does have a lot of covering up that the camera would bring to light, hence I don’t see them using it on their “high level” operations.

  6. Stunner, in a paradoxical sense, one would not be inordinately or extremely surprised, if the sundry criminal elements —- dons, gangsters, druggists, area leaders, thugs, goons, gun men, et al —- operating within the various layers or levels of the society, with their respective uptown/bourgeois connections and linkages have not eclipsed and exceeded the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) regarding the incorporation, application and utilization of modern technologies in their persistent and brutal savagery being waged—- war —- against civil society. Stunner,et al, please be mindful of the fact, that Jamaica is a CRIMINAL STATE, and in a society such as ours, CRIME DOES PAY. As a matter of fact, it is extremely lucrative when the cost benefit analysis is done from the criminals’ perspective. Consequently, the myriad criminals —- including so called WHITE COLLAR CRIMINALS, which incidentally includes politicians, businessmen, technocrats, and so called pillars of the society domiciled in their uptown garrisons —- that/who have ostensibly seized, transformed, and metamorphosed, a once decent, moral, self-respecting and law abiding society into a CRIMINAL STATE. Interestingly, and undoubtedly, for such criminals to maintain such a status quo, i.e., a CRIMINAL STATE, they will have to invest in the latest technologies in terms of weapons, arsenal, inter alia from their lucrative resources acquired over the years.Unquestionaly, Jamaican police, comparatively, may be fighting this brutal war barefeet to the awesome sophistication of the criminals in terms of weapons and possibly other technologies.Nuff Respect!!

  7. @ Stunner: I am really glad you bring up these two counter-points because I’m sure other readers were thinking that “me mussa confuse yard wid foreign.” When you say “…we don’t even have money for decent police stations…” do you mean we don’t have sufficient money for decent police stations or that we haven’t spent sufficient money for decent police stations?

    Contrastingly we seem to have money to purchase a new late-model luxury automobile for every new minister of government — yet we don’t have money for police stations? Our priorities are truly stunning, you know Stunner.

    Also, I would not “request” that the JCF wear the helmets; it would be an order.

  8. So when yuh gi dem di helmet, yuh also going to tell dem when an when dem mus an’ muss’n use it? Cause I can see dem man a do all ki’n a foolishness whe’ nuh have nutt’n fi do wid police work. Yuh get me? An I would make all di highway patrol people dem wear it. Not dat dem a do one damn lik a work more dan drive roun inna govament cyar and do all ki’n a ting, but maybe it will coerce them to do some work.

    As for the paltry state of police stations. How come the stations still look like dungeons from the 1920’s? All dem a ask fi more money an dem cyaa demand betta work conditions? A becau’ dem naa do no work dat’s why. But better facilities does improve both morale as well as accountability. Right now, we really can’t expect much from them in part because they really do operate like rent-a-cops, and the corruption is in part their willingness to get a little extra. This whole system needs to change. Why am I not a consultant on that project? Send my name to mark shields before he leaves??!!

  9. Crime pays far too much in JA to rout it. Too many people earn an income from it, and not only the shottas either. While on the point of luxury vehicles, does anyone have a clue on those BMWs bought during WCC for the purpose of “transporting officials”? Nat a word on their location, or if they were sold, crashed, given as gifts, sent back to BMW after the event — has anyone a clue?
    Mark Shields, hawhaw. Who wants to bet that he leaves the force but not the island? Anyone?

    Foreigners, especially palefaces, find Jamaica particularly alluring, because they find their status upgraded in our little pond.
    (I bet MS has a cool deal in the bag when the contract ends)

  10. On second thoughts, I want the job of Accountant- General. Kadene, you know, there’s a job for you right deh so. Whatever happened to…..? Investigate the answers, prepare quarterly reports and sell them like a periodical!! You will be out of business when the corruption ends.

  11. @ Kadene: Jah know, if I was an average white person in N. America or Europe I would live in Jamaica, another Caribbean country or somewhere in Africa where black people will exalt me and genuflect in an uncritical subservience as I live and work among them.

    We are told, by Europeans, that the natives worshipped Cortez as a god upon his arrival. Five hundred years later, and how little has changed.

    I stand by my previous assertion that Shields should be expelled.

    @ Longbench: I will write more about the helmets and police “performance standards” (what NYC calls its quotas) in an upcoming post.

  12. Kadene, I have often wondered myself, what happened to those BMW’s purchased during the cricket world cup? Guess what! I would be willing to hazard a guess, but I think we all know what happened to these automobiles.Nuff respect!!

  13. Longbench, I could definitely see you in the capacity of Accountant-General. Hopefully, under your watch, many of these criminals now raping and pillaging the society of its limited resources would/will be fashionably dressed in their short pants at the Tower Street facility.Nuff respect!!

  14. @ Longbench: I like the job you picked for Kadene. Didn’t Jamaica used to have those, what were they called again…..hmmm….oh! Newspapers!!!! That was it….whatever happened to them?

  15. @D – Oh yes, those things. Well, there are Newspapers of the “all that’s fit to print” genre, and then there are the broadsheets produced by muckrakers. The latter is far more meaty and not at all beholden to anything but the Truth. I say we need more popular journalism ie. Journalism of and by the people.

    As A-G, I don’t want to be beholden to even the PM. Not a single check or payment would go out without adequate justification and my signature. An’ di cyar dem woudda’ affi account fa! I would even do this job for free!! If smaddy can tief millions of dollars from the finance ministry just so, den me cyan tu’n A-G, just so. At least my intentions are honourable.

  16. Diatribalist, there is a possibility that you may have already seen or read the short piece by the BBC about Jamaica and the vote for the death penalty. If you have not seen or read it as yet, you may want to check it out, because it provides the actual numerical breakdown of how the politicians —-members of the House of Representatives —- voted in terms of support, abstention, and against. By the way thirty five politicians supported the death penalty.

  17. With regard to the question of the death penalty, let me categorically state that I do not support capital punishment as the answer to Jamaica’s monstrous crime problem.Nonetheless, it has become increasingly and abundantly clear/obvious, that the Opposition leader, Ms. Portia Simpson-Miller, is definitely being evasive, slippery and vacilliating with regard to her absences from Parliament whenever this highly controversial subject rears its ugly head for a vote or discussion in Parliament.Witness her absences in 1979, November 19th, 2008 and November 24th, 2008. Indeed, these absences from Parliament are not coincidental, as suggested or purported, with respect to other engagements. As a matter of fact, they suggest a high level of calculation, couched within the context of avoidance, dodging, subterfuge, political irresponsibility and political cowardice and gutlessness on the part of Ms. Simpson-Miller to be absent from such a critical conscience vote and discussion that may or will impact on the society either positively or negatively in the short to medium term. The rationalization on the part of the Opposition as to her absence(s) on crucial national issues of this nature, reveals a political animal that/is extremely political deficient and irresolute.

  18. With regard to the question of the death penalty, let me categorically state that I do not support capital punishment as the answer to Jamaica’s monstrous crime problem.Nonetheless, it has become increasingly and abundantly clear/obvious, that the Opposition leader, Ms. Portia Simpson-Miller, is definitely being evasive, slippery and vacilliating with regard to her absences from Parliament whenever this highly controversial subject rears its ugly head for a vote or discussion in Parliament.Witness her absences in 1979, November 19th, 2008 and November 24th, 2008. Indeed, these absences from Parliament are not coincidental, as suggested or purported, with respect to other engagements. As a matter of fact, they suggest a high level of calculation, couched within the context of avoidance, dodging, subterfuge, political irresponsibility and political cowardice and gutlessness on the part of Ms. Simpson-Miller to be absent from such a critical conscience vote and discussion that may or will impact on the society either positively or negatively in the short to medium term. The rationalization on the part of the Opposition as to her absence(s) on crucial national issues of this nature, reveals a political animal that/who is extremely political deficient and irresolute.

  19. Congratulations to Dr.Carolyn Gomes on being awarded the United Nations Human Rights Award for 2008.

  20. Congratulations are in order for Dr.Carolyn Gomes on being awarded the United Nations Human Rights Award for 2008.

  21. Talk the truth: don’t being away from the island give yu a likkle freedom to comment? A kine a feel sey probbly if I was down dere so, a woulda see an bline, an hear an deaf jus like the rest.

    When I visit, I just observe, since once at dinner I protested a little bit too much about a mob chopping up three goat thieves. Man, it was 7 to 1, and dem nevva mek fun.

    Everyone thought the thieves more than deserved it. Tragic when you have no other option but to condone murder.

  22. In light of D’s statement about the big foreign local fish in the guppy pond, I read an article recently (forgot where) that claimed that all this crowing about Obama’s victory was overkill, since the Jamaican society was “post-racial” and way ahead of the US, having in the 80’s elected its very own white PM in a nation with a black majority.

    Could have been the NYTimes, I’ll look it up, but it was exceedingly funny.

  23. Without a doubt being Up So gives me the freedom of being an American making comments on an American internet server under American laws. But, often to my detriment, I have a bad habit of acknowledging painful truths — here and there.

  24. Kadene, with respect to freedom to comment, Jamaica promotes too much GROUP THINK on many critical and essential issues affecting the society, and in many instances, critical autonomous and independent political thought/opinion/perspective is often stymied or thwarted. Your experience at dinner regarding the hacking or chopping up of the goat thieves is a classic case in point. Also, thought and opinion are highly constrained and conventional, and in many instances, comments on various subjects/topics are not highly informed via reading, experience, or empirically acquired, but are of an emotional nature.Finally, many individuals do not and cannot think outside of the proverbial box. With regard to thought and comment, one is a proponent and a purveyor of free speech, hence, let a hundred, or for that matter, a thousand or five thousand different flowers bloom and let us as a society and people escape the narrow confines and rigidity of excessive GROUP THINK .Nuff respect!!

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